Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt

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Description

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt

In the early 2000s, humorous, political, and “statement” t-shirts became the rage, especially after pop celebrities started taking them on. They are also hugely popular for events, charity causes and local businesses. As of 2015, the t-shirt shows no sign of decreasing in popularity as casual is still cool and even fashionable…even as some minor trends show an increasing interest in more professional-looking (and often embroidered) polo shirts, uniforms and more modest clothing.Now, for a completely useless trivia fact from Wikiped“The current holder of the Guinness World Record for “Most T-Shirts Worn at Once” with 257 T-shirts is Sanath Bandara. The record was set in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on December 22, 2011. The record was attempted on stage in front of a crowd of people in a public park in Colombo. Bandara surpassed previous record-holder Hwang Kwanghee from South Korea, who had held the record at 252 shirts.”

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt9

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt9

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt11

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt11

Drive Slow Drunk Campers Matter Shirt

When putting on my new riding jacket for the first time, something occurred to me. The elbow-length sleeves of my usual shift were hard to control under the long, tight sleeves of the riding jacket. It started me wondering if women wore a different type of garment with their equestrienne costume. After all, they wore hats and waistcoats similar to men’s. The riding jacket itself was based on the man’s frock coat. Why would they wear a female shift underneath it?So I picked up my trusty copy of Cunnington’s “History of Underclothes” and opened it to 1711-1790. The pages practically fell open to a section entitled “Habit-Shirts”! A comtemporary account (Diary of a Country Parson, April 24, 1782) gives us some idea of how much fabric went into a habit shirt. The Parson bought “4 yards of long Lawn at 3/6 per yard for Nancy to make her riding Habit Shirts and ½ yard of corded Muslin for Ruffles at 9/ per yard.”